Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • Emily Stotter
    Participant
    @emilyrobinson
    4 years, 8 months ago

    Hi ladies!! I just got my very first press, a 9×13 C&P Gordon and need some advice on getting it up and running–particularly how to clean and de-rust it, where or how to re-cover my rollers (do I need new trucks too?), and just how to use it (yeah I’m that new to this), particularly with photopolymer plates to start (I’ll get into setting type soon after). Where is the best place to buy ink & how can I learn how to mix it? Is there someone near Northumberland (Central) Pennsylvania who may be nearby and could spare some time looking it over and setting it up with me? Lots of love and tons of excitement!! – Emily


    Casey McGarr
    Participant
    @caseymcgarr
    4 years, 8 months ago

    Rollers: Advanced Roller, (951) 272-3010, office@advancedroller.com and you order trucks from them also.

    Ink: Oldham Ink Group, kbooth@oldhamgroup.com, (817) 554-0041. Talk to Kurt, I’ve been buying oil based ink from them for the past 12 years.

    Mixing Ink: Your Uncoated Pantone book will show the mix in parts (left side) and percentages (right side). I use a digital scale for cooking to measure the ink. I’ll set the weight to grams and use the percentage for the Pantone color to mix the ink. Example: Pantone 151 Orange is 75 g of Pantone Yellow and 25 grams of Pantone warm red. Oldham can mix your inks but mixing your own will save time and money.

    Rust: Navel Jelly from hardware store for rust removal and a Scotch Bright green pad.

    You’ll get other advise but this has always worked for me.

    Casey

    Inky Lips Press 


    Emily Stotter
    Participant
    @emilyrobinson
    4 years, 8 months ago

    Thanks so much Casey.

    Ink: I’ve read some good things about rubber and oil-based inks. Why do you prefer oil?

    Initial cleaning: It’s got dirt, debris, and oil on it. Should I clean before de-rusting with warm water and a soap of some kind?

    Best,

    Emily


    Casey McGarr
    Participant
    @caseymcgarr
    4 years, 8 months ago

    I prefer oil based ink, I will use mineral spirits to wash up the ink and go on press with another color. Rubber base ink can remain open on press without drying but I clean mine up when finished printing, personal preference.

    Simple green spray bottle works really good for cleaning off the grim, wear gloves. Yes, after you’ve removed the grim then apply rust removal (use gloves, mask, and well ventilated area).


    Emily Stotter
    Participant
    @emilyrobinson
    4 years, 8 months ago

    Thank you! How often to you oil your press and how do you do so (if I’m wearing you out on questions, feel free to stop answering). 🙂 I read that there are small oil holes here and there on the press? Not sure where to look for them.


    Barbara Jean Yaple
    Participant
    @barbarajeanyaple
    4 years, 4 months ago

    Hi Emily,

    (I’m a bit cofused, since I don’t think C&P made a 9×13 platen.) The designation comes from the size measured on the inside of the chase. I’m betting it is either a 10×15, or 8×12. Either one is a fine machine, and I’ve owned both and loved them. I’m assuming it is a hand-fed and not automatic, right? OK—oiling it is very important, and in my shop we used to try to oil the press every four or five operating hours, or once a week at least. I found it easy to establish a “route” for oiling, beginning at one spot and going around the press. For example, beginning at the top at the ink fountain, if it is so equipped. No ink fountain? Start at the rear of the ink disc where there are a couple of oil holes for the disc axle. Also, there should be an oil hole for the ratchet arm and end. From there move either direction and wherever you find a hole, fill it with oil. If there are bits that interact against one another, they will need a light coating of oil. The large ring gear and small driving gear on the off-side of the press need grease on occasion. Assuming it is treadle-driven, it’s very important to oil the crank follower arm (between the crankshaft and and the treadle arm), as well as the main bushings for the crank (One on each side of the arm, where it goes through the side-frames of the press.) After you get oil in all the holes you can find, turn the press over a revolution or two and stop in a different position (bed to platen, for example) and see if you can find any more oil holes. Odds are that there will be a couple more holes, hiding out and grinning at your attempts to find them….

    I use single-weight 30 or 40 oil, since when these machines were built, there were no multi-grades.

    It is very important that the machine is clean, and I suggest following advise already given. You also might ask your roller supply house what they suggest for cleaning your rollers. Oh, and when setting up the machine, begin with a gap between the rollers and the type, and work in toward a nice solid contact. This avoids punching a roller or ruining type.

    (I do ramble on….my apologies. I used to teach press operation at our local community college, and I guess one never out-grows the need to explain in painful detail.) How about this: go slowly, follow your instincts, and “when in doubt, back it out!”

    Best of luck,

    Barb


    Emily Stotter
    Participant
    @emilyrobinson
    1 week, 2 days ago

    Hi Barb! My apologies for the VERY long delay here. I hope you’re still well and appreciate all of your advice SO much. I’m just now finally getting around to recovering the rollers, etc. I’ll be taking your advice into consideration heavily as I get her up and running. And to clarify it is a Gordon 9×13.

    It doesn’t seem to have a treadle (I have photos and video if you’d like to take a peek). It does have a motor though that my husband and I are trying to get working again.

    Warmly,
    Emily

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