Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • Laura Wentzel
    Participant
    @laurawentzel
    10 years, 5 months ago

    Hi All,

    I just acquired an 8×12 C&P and I’m having a lot of trouble getting the rollers on and off. I’m used to my tabletop Sigwalt where you can easily pull on the saddle. 

    With the C&P, the top two saddles are connected and I cannot, for the life of me, figure an easy way of getting them on and off! The tension is too great and there’s not much movement with that double saddle. 

     

    Any advice? Thanks so much in advance!

     

    -Laura


    kelly mcmahon
    Participant
    @kellymcmahon
    10 years, 5 months ago

    Laura, 

    If you’re looking at the press from the front, the right-hand saddle should have a little 2″ long rod that sticks out, and you can use that to wedge the saddle up over one core.  There is a whole lotta tension in those springs, and you’re not really going to be able to pull them very far.

     

    Good luck!

    Kelly


    Laura Wentzel
    Participant
    @laurawentzel
    10 years, 5 months ago

    Thanks Kelly! I checked it out and my press doesn’t have that 2” long rod that sticks out. It doesn’t have any sort of tool to help pull the saddles up to place the rollers in.

     

     


    Kseniya Thomas
    Keymaster
    @kseniya
    10 years, 5 months ago

    It’s easiest if you start with the roller at the top. Standing on the right side of the press (if you’re facing it in the operator’s position), put that top roller in first by sliding the core under the saddle furthest from you (across the ink disk) and use the butt of your hand to push the saddle closest to you up just enough to ease the roller core into it. With that top roller in, it’s easier to get the second roller in place: slide the far core under the saddle first, and, using your thumb, pivot the saddle closest to you (sort of clockwise, or up), to move the core into position. The bottom roller is last, and I put it in the same way, but generally pull up the saddle closest to me with my thumb to get the core in place. Does all that make sense?


    Laura Wentzel
    Participant
    @laurawentzel
    10 years, 5 months ago

    Thanks!

    So you let the rollers lay over the ink disc? I’m afraid to do that because there’s so much tension that I don’t want to bend the cores. I have been doing your method of order though.  There also doesn’t seem to be much room when I pivot the top saddle to get the second roller in. That’s the hardest one! 🙂

    Thanks so much for your help though!


    Kseniya Thomas
    Keymaster
    @kseniya
    10 years, 5 months ago

    Right, with the rollers over the disk. I don’t thing you’ll bend the cores–there ought to be enough spring in the springs so that they’ll come out far enough. If you need to, you can push the saddle up with your hand to get the second roller in. If you push straight up–that is, in a straight line (the line the spring would make if it shot out!), it’ll extend enough for you to get the roller in. My interns have trouble with this at first, till they realize that there’s not much resistance if you push in the right direction.


    Rick Hawkins
    Participant
    @rickhawkins
    10 years, 5 months ago

    most c&p presses have a little rod on the right saddle to pull on to remove the rollers

     

    does your not have that?

     

    i see you say it doesn’t

     

    does it have the hole for the pin?

     

    xx rick


    Laura Wentzel
    Participant
    @laurawentzel
    10 years, 5 months ago

    It has, what I am assuming, a few oil holes… where would the hole for the pin be located?


    kelly mcmahon
    Participant
    @kellymcmahon
    10 years, 5 months ago

    Sorry for the strange lighting, but this is what the pin on the right saddle looks like:


    Michael Seitz
    Participant
    @michaelseitz
    10 years, 5 months ago

    Hmmm…

     

       When I change rollers, I do the following:

     

       Pull chase and run rollers to halfway down the chase area–this is where the springs have the least tension.

     

       Remove the single roller first, otherwise it gets in the way later.

     

       Working at the right side roller saddle/bracket, put my thumb at the top corner of the saddle and lever out the saddle until I can get the roller lifted out–then carefully do the same on the left, hoping that the truck(s) will not fall off and land on the floor underneath the press.  If the little rod on the right hand saddle is present, this is a whole lot simpler yet.

     

        Repeat for the bottom roller–though it should take little effort to get that one out.

     

        Replacement is the reverse of removal.

     

        IF you are running a KLUGE–you will really want to the nifty roller removal lever-as the springs on a Kluge are extremely hefty and no fun to do by hand.

     

     

     


    Laura Wentzel
    Participant
    @laurawentzel
    10 years, 5 months ago

    Thank you for the visual! It’s really great to see. I do not have that rod unfortunately. Maybe I can re-create it.

     

    Michael, thanks for the step-by-step. It’s how I am doing it as well but it takes a bit more effort. Or maybe I’m not as strong! 🙂

     

     

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